Navigate / search

Say it in 60: Studio 5

This week on Studio 5, host Brooke Walker did a segment called “Say it in 60,” where she asked me a series of rapid-fire questions for one minute. I answered them on the spot as quickly as I could, and the results were sometimes hilarious!

Watch the video to find out if I prefer manicures or pedicures, diamonds or pearls, and diet Coke or regular Coke. I also reveal my secret talent.

The best part is toward the end when Brooke asks me what I think of when I hear the phrase “power tool.” (Hint: it’s a beauty product!)

5 Survival Strategies for Work-at-Home Moms

These days, more and more women with children are choosing to work from home.  This has many advantages:  increased flexibility, spending more time with the kids, and supplementing the family income are all attractive reasons to pursue work opportunities from home.  But there are unique challenges as well:  these women have constant interruptions and may experience difficulty concentrating with the distractions of home life.  Here are 5 survival skills for work-at-home moms:

Read more

Should You Let Your Kids Win?

Games are a fun family activity. But how important is winning for children? Should parents play full out, or are there times when they should let kids win?

In an article that’s going viral, a blogger who goes by The Lunchbox Dad says when he and wife “play board games, sports, card games, or hopscotch with our kids-we don’t let them win. We never have.”

Read more

My Top 5 Conversational Pet Peeves

conversational pet peeves

There’s an art to good conversation, and sometimes we don’t get it quite right.  When it comes to conversational mishaps, there’s impolite…and then there’s annoying.  Certain patterns are not only irritating but also don’t work or move the relationship forward.  Here are five conversational pet peeves to avoid (we’re all guilty of at least a few!) :

1)  Asking Veiled Questions

This refers to asking something in a roundabout way instead being upfront.  For example, you might ask your friend, “what are your plans this Saturday?”, but what you really want to know is, “can you help me move this Saturday?”  The reason this is problematic is because it creates anxiety for the other person.  He/ she has to guess what it is you’re going for.  It’s much better to be direct and honest about your question.

2)  Arguing Feelings with Facts

This means that someone addresses an emotional concern with a statement instead of validating feelings.  For example, a woman may tell her husband that it hurts her feelings when he often comes home late without calling her.  If he responds, “I wasn’t late on Monday!” he is fixating on the facts instead of addressing the fact that she is upset.  Some people resort to this tactic as a way to avoid blame, but it often backfires and leaves the other person even more frustrated than before.  Focus on the real issue instead of getting distracted by the details.

3)  Offering Opinions as Reality

Some people are so committed to their views that they see them as absolute truth.  A parent may say something like, “That teacher is horrible!”, but what is a much better alternative is “My daughter really struggled in that teacher’s class.” It’s important to be aware of our own bias and own up to our feelings.  Recognize that not everyone else will necessarily have your same experience or opinion.

4)  Leading with “Don’t you think…?

We’ve all heard someone say, “Don’t you think…?” and then proceed with his/her own view about something.  It’s a way of framing the conversation to be controlling.  Leading a sentence this way is also a setup for an argument with someone who doesn’t agree.  Don’t assume someone has the same view as you, and resist the temptation to bandwagon people to your side.

5)  Hijacking Feedback

This refers to how some individuals confronted with critical feedback turn the dialogue back on themselves.  For example, if you tell a friend that you were offended that you were left out of a group lunch, she would be hijacking the feedback if she said something along the lines of, “I’m such a bad friend!  I always leave people out, and I’m not considerate of other people.”  You then are forced to comfort her from her shame, whereas she should be the one owning up to what she did.  In situations like these, it’s important to really hear the other person out, resist making it about you, and then owning up to your words or actions.

When a Loved One Experiences a Faith Transition

When a loved one goes through a faith crisis showing respect, compassion, and trust in the relationship are key


When a Loved One Experiences a Faith Transition

Religion is a part of our culture and our identity, both individually and as a society.  Sometimes, however, a person experiences a faith crisis (sometimes referred to as a faith transition) and chooses a different path.  Studies show that 28% of Americans change their religious preference at least once in their lives, and the number continues to grow.  This is an issue that hits the hearts and homes of many in our community, and can unfortunately be a source of great pain, confusion, and potential conflict in families.  Here are some strategies to handle a faith transition of a loved one:  

Read more

Race Car Therapy? Studio 5 Dare Week

What happens when a therapist gets behind the wheel of a race car?

Julie Hanks driving race car

This has got to be one of the most fun TV segments I’ve ever done! As part of Studio 5′s series “5 Days 5 Dares” I got to do something I’ve always wanted to do but didn’t dare—learn how to drive a race car! Miller Motor Sports Park graciously allowed me to enroll in their Ford Racing School. Watch what happens when a therapist gets behind a the wheel of a Mustang!

Ask Julie: What Should I Say?: Studio 5

Straightforward advice for your toughest relationship situations!

This week on KSL TV’s Studio 5 with Brooke Walker I tackle viewer’s tough relationship dilemmas in this new Q & A segment called “Ask Julie.”

Read more

Managing Friendship Breakups: Studio 5

Adult friendships can be hard to cultivate and maintain.  When you notice a friend seeming a bit stand-offish, stops returning calls, or gives you a cold shoulder you should you say something or let the friendship go? I offer some advice on how to deal with adult friendship break-ups.

Read more

Do’s and Don’ts of Online Counseling: Studio 5

There are many people who feel that they don’t have time to see a counselor or may be prevented by other circumstances from seeking counseling. Online counseling is now offering these people the opportunity to find the help they’re hoping for. There are a couple things to keep in mind when exploring this as a possibility. Watch the segment to hear my suggestions.

Supporting A Loved One With Mental Illness: Studio 5

On Studio 5 a brave Utah woman shares her story of her husband’s struggle with mental illness. Because those who suffer don’t “look” ill, they are often misunderstood and don’t get the support offered to those with a visible illness. Here are 5 ways we can better support friends and family members struggling with mental illness.

Read more