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When Your Partner’s Adorable Habits Become Annoying: WSJ Interview

fatal attraction

Have you ever been annoyed by certain habits or quirks of your partner that you once found endearing?  Perhaps you were drawn to a man because you admired his work ethic, but then later came to see him as a workaholic.  Or maybe you initially liked how a woman was dedicated to physical fitness, but eventually  felt she was self-absorbed.  This phenomenon, which experts refer to as a fatal attraction, can wreak havoc on relationships.

I had the opportunity to give my insight on this topic in a new Wall Street Journal article out today entitled, “How to Cope When You and Your Partner are Falling Out of Love.” Other relationship experts and I discuss how to appropriately handle this fatal attraction in such ways as recognizing that every character trait has pros and cons, reflecting on what you do appreciate about your romantic partner, and considering how the other person brings balance to the relationship.

Click here to read the article in full.

 

 

 

Therapist Blog Challenge #13: Mental Health and Parenting


Therapist Blog Challenge #13

The therapist blog challenge is back! I’m making it easy to blog regularly as a practice building strategy.

Rather than start a new challenge, I’ve decided to pick up where we left off last year — with challenge #13. If you are new to the challenge, you can start with challenge #1 or you can start with this current challenge. The goal of the challenge is to make it easier for you to blog regularly on your private practice website. Blogging can boost SEO, provide valuable information on your specialty areas, lets potential clients get to know you better, and establishes you as an expert. These factors can lead to more clients choosing your practice.

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Get Graphic! Using Visual Content to Build Your Online Practice Presence

Get Graphic

Photos, graphics, and memes can help build engagement and grow your online private practice presence.

Visual content is becoming increasingly important to a business’s online presence, and your therapy practice would do well to get on board.  Nothing can replace quality written content, but too many words on a page can be overwhelming and/or dull. In fact, visual media networks, such as YouTube and Instagram have more referral traffic than Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+ combined.  It makes sense, as studies show that 90% of the information transmitted to our brain is visual and that we  process images 60,000 times faster than text.  Additionally, information presented visually is much more likely to be retained, so your followers will remember things better than just plain text.  So don’t be afraid to put some quality and purposeful images out there to help boost your online engagement.  Here are some examples of ways to get graphic and connect with your readers visuals. Read more

5 Signs It’s Time To Raise Your Fees

10.02.09

It’s common for therapists in private practice to have anxiety around money issues like how much to charge per session, how to ask clients for payment, and when to raise your fees. Getting comfortable talking about fees with clients is crucial to private practice success.

After all, you own a business. In general, I think therapists charge too little for their services.

Several years ago, I resigned from managed care and I raised my psychotherapy fees at the same time. Fortunately, my practice didn’t suffer financially from those decisions. What surprised me most about raising my per session fee was that the perceived value of my services went up. “You don’t take insurance and charge a lot? You must be really good,” was a sentiment that I heard frequently from potential clients.

Interestingly, I’ve found that clients tend to invest more in the therapy process because they are investing more money out of their own pocket for treatment.

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Do You Need Permission To Succeed?

As a recent private practice consultation group that I was leading came to an end, we took a few minutes to celebrate the growth and successes of each group member. I asked what each group would take away from their consultation group.  One therapist turned to me and said, “Thank you for giving me the permission to succeed.”

I have never really thought about my private practice consulting services as giving colleagues “permission to succeed,” but it seemed to fit. I asked myself, “Where did I get the permission to succeed?” Read more

How To Find Top Student Interns To Grow Your Practice

There is an “it” factor when looking for interns to train in your private practice.

Here’s how I’ve found amazing interns that stay at my clinic even after graduation.

Over the past several years I have trained and mentored many graduate students and new graduates working toward clinical licensure. Working with interns has been a great way to build my practice, leverage my time, and satisfy the part of me that loves mentoring.

Most graduate students who train at my clinic during school are offered a therapist position after graduation which creates a win-win situation — the student gets a job they’re already trained for and I get to add talented and enthusiastic therapists to my team! After interviewing several therapists, I’ve learned to be very selective about who I bring on at Wasatch Family Therapy.

I recently consulted with a private practice therapist who has a waiting list for new clients. As we started exploring the option of hiring a graduate student to train she expressed some concerns. Her biggest questions were: Read more

Social Media Bootcamp For Therapists Webinar Feb 27

Social Media Bootcamp: Attract Self-Pay Clients to Your Private Practice
Date: Thursday Feb. 27  5:00 pm MST (4:00 pm PST, 6:00pm CST, 7:00pm EST)
Presenter: Julie de Azevedo Hanks, LCSW
Attract more self-pay clients to your private practice by effectively and ethically using social media.

How to Create and Sell Your First E-book (part 2)

In this guest post, counselor and consultant Clinton Power share how to put the finishing touches on your E-book and how to get the word out and sell your book. (Read part 1 how to create your first E-Book)

Use a graphic designer to make your E-book stunning

If you’re planning on creating a PDF version of your E-book to sell through your website, you definitely want to get it professionally designed. Your designer can then employ visuals, highlight quotes, and use attractive fonts and graphic design elements to draw the reader in and make reading your E-book a pleasure. Your designer will also create a compelling cover page, which is essential as it will make a big difference whether people are attracted to your E-book or not.

If you’re going down the Amazon route, you won’t need a designer to design the inside, but you will need an awesome cover design so you stand out from the thousands of books in Amazon.

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How to Create and Sell Your First E-book (part 1)


How to write an E-book

In this guest post counselor and consultant Clinton Power shares how to create your first E-Book

There’s no doubt that creating and selling your own digital product is a great way to increase your online exposure, credibility, expertise, and earn some money while doing so.

And the creation of an e-book to sell through your own website or an online bookstore like Amazon or iBooks is the quickest and easiest product to create to get started.

I wrote my own e-book called 31 Days to Build a Better Relationship and published using the Kindle platform on Amazon. It’s been a great way to increase my online presence and credibility as a specialist in relationships and has now been downloaded over 2000 times and received 19 five star reviews in Amazon.

With a $2.99 price tag, I didn’t write it to make money (though the checks from Amazon are very nice), but more to reach thousands of people that I never could have on my own, through the power of the Amazon Marketplace.

Selling an e-book through your own website is also a very good idea, and the good news is you can charge much more than Amazon e-book prices.

So let’s dive in and look at the steps you need to get started.

Select a topic that will sell

It’s important to do some research at the beginning to check there’s a market for your e-book and people looking for the information you want to write about.

As a therapist you are well positioned to create an information product because you have years of training, knowledge and experience about good mental health, the change process, and self-improvement. These information products are often in high demand because they are providing a solution to a pain or problem.

So to get your research underway I suggest you start with Google and Amazon. Search for keywords that are related to the e-book you’re considering writing.

For example, if you’re a specialist in child ADD/ADHD, search for combinations of keywords in Amazon and Google such as “How to overcome child ADD”, or “I think my child has ADHD”, or “best ideas for dealing with ADD”. The idea is you want to see how many people already have products for sale that are similar to your idea.

If you find similar products, but your idea has a particulate angle that is not covered by other e-books, then this is a good thing.

There are hundreds of books on relationships in the Amazon store, but I didn’t find one that used my approach of a tip a day for 31 days, so I knew I was bringing in a different angle that might help with sales.

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